The History of Australian English

Australian English has developed along a different track to British or US English, with some vocabulary of its own. There are particular words and phrases that are uniquely Australian, meaningless to many from outside the county, but part of what binds Australians to each other.

The history of Australian English reflects the history of the country as a whole – Aboriginal words, convict slang and words from various migrant groups all having been assimilated.

Aboriginal Influences

Long before a word of English was ever spoken in Australia, the Aboriginal languages were heard all over the continent. Each Aboriginal grouping has its own language, but those languages spoken close to what later became the main centres of European population were those which have had the most influence on modern Australian English.

Commonly used Aboriginal words include many animal names, such as kookaburra, koala, wallaby and dingo. Many Australian place names are Aboriginal, and not always because the Aboriginal people themselves called a place by that name. The capital Canberra is so-named because it means ‘meeting place’.

Other Aboriginal words common in Australian English include ‘yakka’, meaning work – normally used as part of the phrase ‘hard yakka’; and ‘cooee’, first used by Aboriginal people calling each other through the bush. ‘Cooee’ has, of course, found its way into British English too.

Aboriginal words are likely to have been absorbed into English as local leaders from both native groups and colonists tried to find some tentative common ground; and as the new arrivals sought to find names for the strange new things they were seeing.

Immigrant Influences

Whether convicts or willing migrants, the Europeans who found their way to Australia from the eighteenth century onwards came from a wide range of different groups. At that time, there were great differences between different British English dialects, so that convicts from different regions of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland would all have spoken very differently. Some would not have spoken English at all – being Irish or Scots Gaelic or Welsh speakers.

To understand each other, these groups would have begun to create a common language, and words from various dialects would have become part of a new slang and new idioms. The children of those early settlers would have been keen to mark themselves out as Australians, rather than Irish or English, and that meant that new accents and speech patterns developed as quickly as the colony itself did.

It was almost as if an informal Australian school of English London and Irish arrivals alike had set itself up. Words which found their way into the language via the convicts include ‘tucker’, an Irish word for food, and ‘swag’ a word from the criminal underworld meaning a parcel of goods taken by a thief, but coming to mean a bushman’s bag.

Later groups of immigrants had their own influence too. The Gold Rush era brought words such as ‘fossick’ and ‘digger’ into common Australian usage. Many terms in common Australian use come from the bushranger tradition, such as ‘bush telegraph’.

The First World War then added another layer of slang, such as ‘dinkum’ meaning genuine or real. Australian English is peppered with unique slang words and particular types of phraseology. The use of diminutive forms of words (such as ‘arvo’ for afternoon or ‘barbie’ for barbecue) is common.

Many of these have found their way into British English in recent years (although they might not be included in the English courses London schools teach!)

Emigrating To Australia

Australia is a beautiful country. The number of people emigrating to and from it is at an all-time high even as 2013 approaches. Considering that emigrating means a permanent move, you have to be careful on the choices you make. You have to be totally prepared.

There are no special concessions about where you want to emigrate. The issues you need to deal with to facilitate successful emigration are the same as those you have to consider when you have to emigrate to the USA, Canada, Russia, etc. Here are some of the factors you need to consider before immigrating to Australia.

Work

One of the biggest factors you have to consider when immigrating to any country, Australia included is your economic capabilities. What are your intended means of livelihood? Australia welcomes skilled professionals to serve in its vast economy.

This is because the country is a thriving economy in the southern hemisphere. According to global economic reports and statistics, the country has exhibited un-interrupted economic growth rate for over 2 decades and this doesn’t seem to be changing even in the midst of a slowing global economic state. This does pose opportunity if you are skilled. However, it still means you have to get ready to fight it out with qualified natives for jobs as well.

Moving your things

Starting over in a new country requires you think carefully about what you will need. Some of the things you need are already in your possession and carrying them over to Australia may be a good thing. Therefore, it’s a good idea if you can get a reliable company like the Go Group (www.go-group.com) to do your moving for you. They have been in the moving business for years and Australia is one of the destinations of their shipment you can rely upon. With a good moving partner, you won’t have to worry about carrying excess baggage with you as you move. All these are better off handled by professionals.

Prepare for the culture change

Australia is a unique country and you need to prepare for the culture change which may come as a shock unless you are well prepared. The country has an exuberant shoreline and extensive beaches because of the ocean proximity. This means many things;

  1. there is so much water, and
  2. because there is so much sunshine.

Make sure that you make every effort to acclimatise yourself to these factors before you arrive, or you may find the whole experience quite overwhelming.

Get an Australian friend

No matter what you read elsewhere, friends are a must if you want to get to a new place or country. There are many Australians out there and finding them is also quite easy. For starters, whoever you meet on your first visit should be on your new radar of friends.

Social media has also made meeting new people easy and since Australians are known as social and friendly people, you need to cast the net wider to reach some who you can be friend. Taking note of all the above will help you move easily.

History of the Mornington Peninsula Region

The Mornington Peninsula was largely settled by English migrants with expertise in sheep, cattle and apple trees. 

The Mornington Peninsula was largely settled by English migrants with expertise in sheep, cattle and apple trees.

The first record of wine from the Peninsula is in 1866 when a wine from Dromana won a gold medal at the Intercontinental Exhibition held in Melbourne. Little more is known of the wine or the vineyard. The Royal Commission on Fruit and Vegetables in 1891 revealed there were six registered vineyards on the Peninsula.

It is believed these vineyards were either uprooted or abandoned during the recession or ravaged by the then rampant vine louse phylloxera.

In 1950 or thereabouts one of the Seppelt family purchased 100 acres in Dromana and decided to ‘experiment’ with 3 acres of vines in a mixture of varieties. However, before a crop could be harvested the property was sold. The purchaser maintained the vineyard and took the harvest to Melbourne and fermented, bottled and matured the wine there. In 1967 a devastating bush fire destroyed the vines.

Following this vines were planted in the Mornington Peninsula area in 1972. The first commercial winery was built at Main Ridge in 1978, however, cellar door sales were illegal under the Shire Planning Scheme, but by the time the first vintage was picked in 1980 the Scheme had been amended to allow sales from the cellar door with enthusiasts having to travel along unmarked, unmade roads to find the winery.

Geography of the Mornington Peninsula region:

The Peninsula consists of a ridge of granite rocks and strata flanked by volcanic’s and sediments. Outside the granite areas the Peninsula rarely exceeds 150m in elevation with the north-east mainly between 30-75 meters.

The Peninsula wine region is defined by Western Port Bay to the west, Bass Strait to the south and Port Phillip Bay to the east. The Peninsula can be divided into three parts:

  1. Mornington Uplands – consists of a ridge of hard rocks with a thin cover of marine and terrestrial sediments.
  2. Port Phillip Lowlands is represented by two formations, the Nepean Peninsula in the south which is a sandy bar separating Bass Strait and Port Phillip Bay, and the Carrum swamp in the north.
  3. Western Port lowlands consist of flat undulating country which has bedrock covered by sand ridges and sheets.

The Mornington Peninsula drains via numerous small creeks and rivers to Port Phillip and Westernport Bays on either side. The region is a cool area and is not subject to frost during the growing season because of its proximity to large bodies of water. The area enjoys good winter rainfall and has dry summers. Its southerly position and the moderating influence of the bays result in its being an area with perhaps the longest/slowest ripening conditions on mainland Australia.

The first record of wine from the Peninsula is in 1866 when a wine from Dromana won a gold medal at the Intercontinental Exhibition held in Melbourne. Little more is known of the wine or the vineyard. The Royal Commission on Fruit and Vegetables in 1891 revealed there were six registered vineyards on the Peninsula. 
It is believed these vineyards were either uprooted or abandoned during the recession or ravaged by the then rampant vine louse phylloxera. 

In 1950 or thereabouts one of the Seppelt family purchased 100 acres in Dromana and decided to ‘experiment’ with 3 acres of vines in a mixture of varieties. However, before a crop could be harvested the property was sold. The purchaser maintained the 
vineyard and took the harvest to Melbourne and fermented, bottled and matured the wine there. In 1967 a devastating bush fire destroyed the vines. 

Following this vines were planted in the Mornington Peninsula area in 1972. The first commercial winery was built at Main Ridge in 1978, however, cellar door sales were illegal under the Shire Planning Scheme, but by the time the first vintage was picked in 1980 the Scheme had been amended to allow sales from the 
cellar door with enthusiasts having to travel along unmarked, unmade roads to find the winery. 

Geography of the Mornington Peninsula region: 
The Peninsula consists of a ridge of granite rocks and strata flanked by volcanic’s and sediments. Outside the granite areas the Peninsula rarely exceeds 150m in elevation with the north-east mainly between 30-75 meters.

The Peninsula wine region is defined by Western Port Bay to the west, Bass Strait to the south and Port Phillip Bay to the east. The Peninsula can be divided into three parts:

1. Mornington Uplands – consists of a ridge of hard rocks with a thin cover of marine and terrestrial sediments.

2. Port Phillip Lowlands is represented by two formations, the Nepean Peninsula in the south which is a sandy bar separating Bass Strait and Port Phillip Bay, and the Carrum swamp in the north.

3. Western Port lowlands consist of flat undulating country which has bedrock covered by sand ridges and sheets. 

The Mornington Peninsula drains via numerous small creeks and rivers to Port Phillip and Westernport Bays on either side. The region is a cool area and is not subject to frost during the growing season because of its proximity to large bodies of water. The area enjoys good winter rainfall and has dry summers. Its southerly position and the moderating influence of the bays result in its being an area with perhaps the longest/slowest ripening conditions on mainland Australia. 

Mornington Peninsula

Whether you’re enjoying the ultra-modern outdoor sports or shopping in the trendy streets of Mornington, sampling superb peninsula wines, relaxing on the beach or dining in one of the many restaurants, cafes & eateries, Mornington Peninsula has it all!

Restaurants & Dining

There are many fine restaurants, cafes & eateries on the Mornington Peninsula

Mornington Peninsula Wineries,vineyards and cellar door wine sales. The Mornington Peninsula boasts more than 100 vineyards, set against a backdrop of stunning landscapes and rugged coastlines. Take the time to aquaint yourself with Melbourne’s own wine region, a place where some of Australia’s finest cool-climate wines are being produced. With its distinct maritime climate, the Mornington Penninsula produces a vast array of quality wines. Traditional varieties of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir excel, and promise has been shown with the lesser known varieties of Viogner and Pinot Gris

Accommodation Bed and Breakfast Guide

Mornington Peninsula is little more than an hour’s drive from Melbourne. The Peninsula, over the last decade or so, has bloomed into a wine and gourmet food lovers mecca. Where once the Mornington Peninsula was a prime destination for seaside family holidays,it now also has rolling vineyards, outstanding restaurants and brilliant retreats for couples who are seeking an indulgent getaway from the usual weekday stresses.

Attractions and Activities on the Mornington Peninsula Try a marine adventure swimming with the seals and dolphins or Scuba diving into reefs and ancient shipwrecks. Join a ‘learn to surf’ school or relax on an ocean beach horseride. Mornington Peninsula activities and attractions

Golf Courses

Mornington Peninsula has an abundance of great golf courses and stunning coastal views from every corner of the Mornington Peninsula. From the traditional layouts of Sorrento and Portsea, the Robert Trent Jones designed National Old Course, and the Scottish feel of The Dunes to the newer Norman designed National Moonah course and Thomson Wolveridge & Perrett designed National Ocean and more recently Moonah Links courses, the Mornington Peninsula is a golfers heaven.

Attractions and Activities on the Mornington Peninsula

Try a marine adventure swimming with the seals and dolphins or Scuba diving into reefs and ancient shipwrecks. Join a learn to surf’ school or relax on an ocean beach horseride. Mornington Peninsula activities and attractions

Visit Mornington Peninsula

Try a marine adventure swimming with the seals and dolphins or Scuba diving into reefs and ancient shipwrecks. Join a learn to surf’ school or relax on an ocean beach horseride. In the hinterland hills behind, you’ll be captivated by the shady lanes, farmgate produce, markets, boutique galleries, B&Bs and wineries. Tranquillity and secret discoveries – you’re
a world away on the Mornington Peninsula! Nice site well designed and easy to get around, plus has a wealth of information.

Visit Victoria

Melbournes Bays and Peninsulas offers some of Victoria‘s premier family destinations, including seaside villages, golf courses and family activities set between two breathtaking and tranquil bays of water. Another great site with a wealth of information and designed for easy navigation, recommended.

Peninsula Tours

Horseriding, nature & eco tours. Cinemas & drive-ins, day spas and tour & car hire services. Useful information covering the above activities with links to individual business.

Marine National Parks and Sanctuaries

The Victorian Government has created a system of 13 Marine National Parks and 11 smaller Marine Sanctuaries. These parks and sanctuaries now protect 5.3% of Victoria’s coastal waters, safeguarding important marine habitats and species, significant natural features, cultural heritage and aesthetic values. The Churchill Island Marine National Park, Mushroom Reef Marine Sanctuary, French Island Marine National Park. Great site to visit with abundance of information plus easy to navigate.